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Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)

All articles from Digital Photography Review
Articles: Digital Photography Review (dpreview.com)
  1. Panoram app will split your panoramas up for easy posting to Instagram Stories

    There are countless apps capable of splitting up a panorama photo so it can be put side by side into an Instagram post, but Panoram appears to be one of the first apps to offer this sort of capability for Instagram/Facebook Stories (or Snapchat).

    Panoram is currently an iOS only app for the time being. As its name suggests, Panoram will take a panoramic photo and split it into three separate frames that can then be uploaded to Instagram, Facebook or Snapchat so they can be viewed as a single image when viewers tap through their feeds. Cropping the photo is done directly in the app using a basic overlay.

    The app itself isn't too special, but its do one thing well approach makes it a nice app to keep around for when needed. Currently there's no option for additional frames, so don't count on using ultra-wide panoramas.

    Panoram is free to download in the iOS App Store. The free version contains ads and plasters a watermark on the final panorama, which can be removed with a $1 USD in-app purchase.

  2. News links on Google may lose thumbnail photos under EU Copyright Directive

    Google has given the public a preview of what Internet news results may look like if EU Copyright Directive Article 11 passes. Under this directive, news aggregators like Google and Bing would be required to pay non-waivable licensing fees in order to display image thumbnails and small text snippets from news articles.

    The European Parliament backed the controversial copyright directive in September 2018 following the rejection of an earlier version in July 2018. Under the directive, the EU seeks to make certain companies liable for infringement of copyrighted content uploaded onto their online platforms (Article 13), and to require news aggregators to pay for displaying anything more than a link to a news source (Article 11).

    The directive has proven divisive. Though proponents argue that the law could help protect copyright holders and traditional publishers, critics have expressed concerns over the directive's potential effects on small publishers and the quality of search engine news aggregation results.

    In its most recent update on the matter, Google gave SearchEngineLand access to an experiment showing what news search results may look like if Article 11 passes -- devoid of image thumbnails, article titles, and text previews.

    The image follows a blog post published by Google News Vice President Richard Gingras in December, who warned that under Article 11:

    ... search engines, news aggregators, apps, and platforms would have to put commercial licences in place, and make decisions about which content to include on the basis of those licensing agreements and which to leave out.

    Effectively, companies like Google will be put in the position of picking winners and losers. Online services, some of which generate no revenue (for instance, Google News) would have to make choices about which publishers they’d do deals with. Presently, more than 80,000 news publishers around the world can show up in Google News, but Article 11 would sharply reduce that number.

    Though the licensing fees paid by Google and similar companies under Article 11 could potentially benefit content creators, that assumes the companies would be willing to pay the fees rather than alter their products.

    In late 2014, Google announced that it was closing down its Google News product in Spain after the country passed legislation that would have required it to pay publishers for displaying a preview of news articles. Google had called the requirement 'unsustainable,' stating that it doesn't display ads on Google News and does not make revenue from that product.

    In 2015, following the loss of Google News, an analysis by NERA Consulting found that publishers in the country experienced an average traffic drop of 6%, with small publishers suffering the most at 14%. German publishers experienced similar issues in 2014.

  3. Feature: Diving with Ilford HP5 and a Nikonos 5 at NASA's Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory

    Diving deep with a Ilford HP5 and a Nikonos 5 at NASA's Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory

    Above: A diver holds out the subject to observe discrepancies in buoyancy | Photo by Moe Lauchert

    Moe Lauchert is a professional commercial photographer whose growing client list includes the likes of Nikon, Henry Repeating Arms and Backcountry.com. Now a full-time photographer, Lauchert's previous work experience includes being a dive instructor in the Cayman Islands and Diver at NASA's Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) in Houston, Texas.

    It was there at NASA's NBL that he decided to embark upon a project that he had been planning for some time — to capture underwater photographs of astronauts and divers at work in the giant pool that serves as a venue for simulated Extravehicular activity (EVA) missions, also known as spacewalks.

    DPReview spoke with Lauchert about how the project came to be, what tools were used, and what it took to capture astronauts preparing for upcoming missions. Below is a transcribed interview from the conversations and above is a gallery of images shared with permission from Lauchert.

    You can find more of Moe Lauchert's incredible work on his website and follow him on Instagram.

    Why did you start this project and how did it come to fruition?

    I was looking to get back into film. I've been flowing in and out of film since college and I wanted to do a fun project to get back into it, especially since I knew I was leaving the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory for a job in the creative field. So, I figured a good way to rework and re-experience that creative flow was to do this project, because the opportunity was readily available and an interesting subject matter.

    In the final stages of the weigh-out, the diver will rotates the NASA crew member into more complex positions to observe their buoyancy | Photo by Moe Lauchert

    I started it mainly as an opportunity to think creatively and critically about photography. So, a few factors played into that, particularly my desire to use film. I was thinking about what mediums would fit this and it just didn't feel right to shoot with some high-polished DSLR, so film was an obvious choice, especially with NASA's rich history of astronauts using Hasselblad cameras in the past. I wanted to shoot a day in the life of a divers, because most people don't know NASA employs divers or what they even do, so this was a two-fold project to be creative and try to bring about this story of divers that most people don't know exist, but are an incredibly important part of astronauts train-up period for EVAs (spacewalks).

    I was thinking about what mediums would fit this and it just didn't feel right to shoot with some high-polished DSLR, so film was an obvious choice, especially with NASA's rich history of astronauts using Hasselblad cameras in the past.

    The gear I decided to use was — well, money was a big factor, but limitations breed creativity. I didn't have a lot of money to work with, or have a lot of experience with underwater film cameras, but after a lot of searching and researching I ended up landing with the Nikonos 5 film camera. It's a 35mm film camera, developed by Jacques-Yves Cousteau and Nikon. It's a completely waterproof unit — no housing or anything.

    Both NASA crew members and their divers (eight in total) continue work on the truss to complete their assigned tasks | Photo by Moe Lauchert

    I used that with a 15mm underwater-specific lens (doesn't focus above water) and an underwater eyepiece that helps reconcile being underwater and framing shot. I used Ilford HP5, which I ended up having to do some funky development with, as well as my regular dive gear. The reason for choosing the gear I did was sort of twofold: one, because underwater housing for digital is expensive and film — and the film look — is both nostalgic and ties in with NASA's rich history with film. Overall, it fit the creative criteria for the shoot.

    I was also influenced by the Nikonos Project. It was a wealth of knowledge as I was getting this project going.

    What challenges did you come across during this project?

    Shooting underwater during a suited operation. All photos were actually taken on my very last day as a diver. I couldn't have them stop and do something again or get different lighting or anything like that. It was pure documentary photography. It was challenging, but also one of my favorite ways to shoot. If I miss my chance, it's totally up to me to be prepared. And to be a diver on top of that, you can't think about diving, you can't worry about your dive skills when you're trying to do this, so your abilities have to be pretty dialed in.

    Another challenge is the pool — it's 200ft long, 100ft wide and 40ft deep, so the lighting was very challenging. I had to get creative with how I developed the film. There was hardly any lighting and no strobes to work with, so the black and white film helped facilitate that. I had to get extremely creative with how I composed things and approached the tonality when it came to the divers and certain areas of the pool.

    The Dive op team assist in the removal of the lo-fi APFR in exchange for a high fidelity version | Photo by Moe Lauchert

    Another challenge was developing and scanning. I had very minimal experience developing film and zero experience scanning, so I was very hesitant to try. I did a lot of test rolls and at one point I even considered having it sent out, but I wanted to have the experience and have my hand in every step of the process, so I just had to gather up all the courage I had and develop the film in my tiny bathroom in my place in Houston. I mixed my own chemistry and everything. I lost 4 frames on the second roll because I was getting a little aggressive in my agitation, so a few negatives stuck together. Another challenge of the developing process was to just gather up the nerves to just do it, because nobody else has these negatives, so it was scary in that way.

    I wanted to show the collaboration between the NASA crew members and the divers and show the symbiosis between the two, because without the help from one another there isn't really a successful program.

    The initial idea behind the project was to show a day in the life of a diver, but I also wanted to show more. I wanted to show the collaboration between the NASA crew members and the divers and show the symbiosis between the two, because without the help from one another there isn't really a successful program. Even post-dive the astronauts would be asking the divers what they could be doing better and what the better path was during the walk.

    On non-suited operation days divers maintain the pool and its various structures

    I guess you could say the divers have the second-most EVA experience being they also have to know everything about the ISS, translation paths, tools, modules and everything that could be bolted, changed, replaced or moved. So you have these insanely smart and driven astronauts asking you for help and it just shows how collaborative that environment actually was. These astronauts have multiple PhDs, incredible amounts of life experiences, but they still manage to stow that ego and those accomplishments because without the collaboration it would be a lot harder to have success on these spacewalks. So to photograph and show that was awesome.

    Final Thoughts

    It hasn't even sank in that this project even happened, because it was just a part of my life. It was like bringing my camera into work and taking photos of your coworkers and friends. The team down there is the most driven, interesting group of individuals and it makes for an incredible experience.


    Editors note: This interview was transcribed and edited for clarity and brevity

    Diving deep with a Ilford HP5 and a Nikonos 5 at NASA's Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory

    Divers assist NASA crew members as they egress the airlock and begin translation to the worksite | Photo by Moe Lauchert

    Diving deep with a Ilford HP5 and a Nikonos 5 at NASA's Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory

    Making their way down the main truss segment of the ISS, a NASA crew member is assisted by divers to ensure a smooth transition in simulated flight-like conditions | Photo by Moe Lauchert

    Diving deep with a Ilford HP5 and a Nikonos 5 at NASA's Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory

    Both NASA crew members and their divers (eight in total) continue work on the truss to complete their assigned tasks | Photo by Moe Lauchert

    Diving deep with a Ilford HP5 and a Nikonos 5 at NASA's Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory

    As the NASA crew members continue their objectives, the NBL divers monitor their condition as well as maintain the worksite while keeping constant vigilance | Photo by Moe Lauchert

    Diving deep with a Ilford HP5 and a Nikonos 5 at NASA's Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory

    The NBL divers each have a specific job to monitor as the NASA crew members make their way to the worksite | Photo by Moe Lauchert

    Diving deep with a Ilford HP5 and a Nikonos 5 at NASA's Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory

    A NASA crew member begins the first task of the suit operation | Photo by Moe Lauchert

    Diving deep with a Ilford HP5 and a Nikonos 5 at NASA's Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory

    A diver assists a NASA crew member in attaching the articulating portable foot restrain (APFR) to SSRMS (The Arm) | Photo by Moe Lauchert

    Diving deep with a Ilford HP5 and a Nikonos 5 at NASA's Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory

    The Dive op team assist in the removal of the lo-fi APFR in exchange for a high fidelity version | Photo by Moe Lauchert

    Diving deep with a Ilford HP5 and a Nikonos 5 at NASA's Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory

    A NASA Crew member adjusts the APFR to a predetermined setting | Photo by Moe Lauchert

    Diving deep with a Ilford HP5 and a Nikonos 5 at NASA's Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory

    NASA crew member and diver work together during a suited op. Shot from inside the Truss | Photo by Moe Lauchert

    Diving deep with a Ilford HP5 and a Nikonos 5 at NASA's Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory

    Divers begin a preliminary check before suit operations can begin | Photo by Moe Lauchert

    Diving deep with a Ilford HP5 and a Nikonos 5 at NASA's Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory

    Divers begin a preliminary check before suit operations can begin | Photo by Moe Lauchert

    Diving deep with a Ilford HP5 and a Nikonos 5 at NASA's Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory

    Divers begin a preliminary check before suit operations can begin | Photo by Moe Lauchert

    Diving deep with a Ilford HP5 and a Nikonos 5 at NASA's Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory

    Divers swim the NASA crew member over the truss to the downline for descent | Photo by Moe Lauchert

    Diving deep with a Ilford HP5 and a Nikonos 5 at NASA's Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory

    Divers swim the NASA crew member over the truss to the downline for descent | Photo by Moe Lauchert

    Diving deep with a Ilford HP5 and a Nikonos 5 at NASA's Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory

    A NASA crew member accompanied by divers navigates the downline for weigh-out | Photo by Moe Lauchert

    Diving deep with a Ilford HP5 and a Nikonos 5 at NASA's Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory

    A diver begins the weigh-out process to achieve three-axis neutral buoyancy which simulates zero-gravity conditions | Photo by Moe Lauchert

    Diving deep with a Ilford HP5 and a Nikonos 5 at NASA's Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory

    A diver begins the weigh-out process to achieve three-axis neutral buoyancy which simulates zero-gravity conditions | Photo by Moe Lauchert

    Diving deep with a Ilford HP5 and a Nikonos 5 at NASA's Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory

    A diver holds out the subject to observe discrepancies in buoyancy | Photo by Moe Lauchert

    Diving deep with a Ilford HP5 and a Nikonos 5 at NASA's Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory

    A diver holds out the subject to observe discrepancies in buoyancy | Photo by Moe Lauchert

    Diving deep with a Ilford HP5 and a Nikonos 5 at NASA's Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory

    On non-suited operation days divers maintain the pool and it’s various structures | Photo by Moe Lauchert

    Diving deep with a Ilford HP5 and a Nikonos 5 at NASA's Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory

    On non-suited operation days divers maintain the pool and it’s various structures | Photo by Moe Lauchert

    Diving deep with a Ilford HP5 and a Nikonos 5 at NASA's Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory

    On non-suited operation days divers maintain the pool and it’s various structures | Photo by Moe Lauchert

    Diving deep with a Ilford HP5 and a Nikonos 5 at NASA's Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory

    On non-suited operation days divers maintain the pool and it’s various structures | Photo by Moe Lauchert

    Diving deep with a Ilford HP5 and a Nikonos 5 at NASA's Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory

    On non-suited operation days divers maintain the pool and it’s various structures | Photo by Moe Lauchert

    Diving deep with a Ilford HP5 and a Nikonos 5 at NASA's Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory

    Even at 15mm and 101ft away the ISS mock up exceeds the frame | Photo by Moe Lauchert

    Diving deep with a Ilford HP5 and a Nikonos 5 at NASA's Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory

    Over/Under shot post dive operations | Photo by Moe Lauchert

  4. DPReview TV: Sony a6400 review

    This week, Sony introduced its newest APS-C camera, the a6400. Of course, Chris and Jordan were on hand to take it for a spin and test out all the new features. Watch to find out what they think of Sony's newest model.

    Get new episodes of DPReview TV every week by subscribing to our YouTube channel!

  5. Should I buy the Sony a6400? Here’s how it compares

    Introduction

    The Sony a6400 is the company's latest midrange mirrorless camera. Its body, 24MP sensor and many of its specs are familiar from the existing model, the a6300.

    And, because it's a new model, the a6400 is, initially at least, more expensive relative to the lineup it fits into. So is it better to buy an older model at a discount price, rather than forking-out more to have the most up-to-date features?

    We'll have a look at how the a6400 compares with its immediate peers and the factors you may wish to consider if you're in the market for a new camera.

    Which is better, a6400 or a6300?

    The a6400 shares a lot with the model it replaces (and, for once, Sony has made clear that it replaces the a6300). They both offer 24MP APS-C sensors, oversampled 4K video and 11 fps continuous shooting. They have the same viewfinder and much of the same hardware. So what's the difference?

    The most immediate difference is a rear screen that's now touch-sensitive and can tilt up by 180 degrees, and allows for touch control of autofocus, selfies and vlogging (though any hot shoe mic will block the screen). These are nice additions, but are unlikely to swing most people towards the (initially) more expensive model, unless you really need one of those things.

    The big difference is autofocus performance and operation. Our initial experiences are that the a6400's AF is simpler to use. Because it's more 'sticky' and consistent, you can use the Real-time Tracking mode for all sort of subjects, rather than having to change mode. It also offers Eye AF without a second button press is smart enough to automatically switch to non-specific subject tracking if the eye or face disappears, then switch back if they reappear.

    The new, presumably more efficient, processor means there's less risk of overheating limiting when capturing video. Unlike its predecessors, the a6400 is not limited to 29:59 minutes of recording time, either, and recorded for over 45 minutes in our initial tests.

    It's also worth considering that Sony will be selling a kit that bundles the a6400 with its recent 18-135mm zoom. It costs more and is larger than the 16-50mm power zoom but covers a wider range (albeit without such wide-angle capability), and has the advantage of not being the weakest kit lens on the market.

    Which should I buy, a6400 or a6500?

    The comparison to the a6500 is more difficult, since the older camera was originally a much more expensive camera and hence has at least one key additional feature: in-body image stabilization.

    In-body stabilization is an undeniably useful feature for photography and is even more valuable if you're shooting video, since it more easily allows shots without a tripod and lets you keep horizons steady in a way in-lens stabilization can't.

    The a6400's AF is significantly better, though: both in terms of performance and ease-of-use (the new AF experience requires much less manual intervention), which is hard to ignore. The a6400 is also quicker to focus and fire off a shot from boot-up, possibly thanks to the new processor. Like the full-frame generation 3 Alpha cameras, you can even assign custom buttons to override your AF mode or other camera settings - a huge plus for a camera with limited dials and buttons.

    Which you choose will come down to which of these features you value more. Or, if you need both and your current setup is workable, can you wait long enough to see if Sony brings an a6400-like upgrade to its stabilized model?

    Is the a6400 better than the a6000?

    Another tempting model is the a6000. Part of the reason it sells so well is because it's cheaper than many of its rivals but it's very much a case that you get what you pay for (it was recognizably stripped-down even for 2014).

    The a6400 is better in every respect. It has several generations of AF improvement, revised user interface and touchscreen, vastly better video capabilities (4K vs 1080) and a better viewfinder. It's a higher-end model, as well as being much newer.

    However, more fundamentally than any of this, the a6400 will offer better image quality. Partly because it has a more modern sensor, but mainly because in the time between the two cameras' launches Sony has continually worked to improve its JPEG color. And the difference is marked: the a6400's output will simply be more attractive, even before you look closely at the sharpening and noise reduction improvements.

    Sony a6400 vs the competition

    Of course, the a6400 faces competition from outside the Sony lineup. And, while this slideshow focuses on how the bodies stack up against one another, it's massively important to consider the lens availability for different systems.

    Don't be swayed by promises of X number of lenses, or cross-compatibility with full frame (the 'upgrade path' might lead to manufacturer profit more directly than to the place where all your photographic problems are solved). Instead check whether the lenses you think you might want exist, for a price you're willing to pay. After all, there's little solace in knowing there's a choice of manual focus 12mm primes if you primarily shoot portraits.

    That said, it's hard to think of a camera that promises the all-round capability of the a6400 in terms of image quality, autofocus and video quality. Not because the Sony's performance is the best possible - its 4K is pretty wobbly, thanks to significant rolling shutter - but because any cameras that outdo it in any regard are all significantly more expensive.

    Sony a6400 vs Panasonic Lumix DC-GX9

    The Panasonic GX9 is probably the Sony's most capable rival. It has a slightly smaller sensor, but feels better built, has more direct controls and adds in-body image stabilization. It also tends to come with a better kit zoom (and a wider range of native lens choices, generally).

    The GX9's autofocus is pretty good, but it can't offer the dependability that we've seen from the a6400 so far. Equally, if you're interested in shooting video, the significant extra crop on the Panasonic means it's noisier and harder to shoot wide-angle with. That said, the GX9's video will be stabilized and it exhibits much less rolling shutter, though like the Sony, you can't attach headphones to monitor your audio.

    Sony a6400 vs Canon EOS M50

    The Canon EOS M50 is the other obvious rival to the Sony. It's been around longer so is less expensive and fits into a system with even fewer native lenses than the a6400 but, like the Sony, it's an unstabilized APS-C mirrorless camera with a built-in viewfinder.

    The Canon's main appeal is that it's comfortable and easy to use. Its AF performance and usability isn't in the same league as the Sony, and its cropped 4K video is distinctly soft by comparison. But, despite a sensor with less dynamic range for Raw shooters, its JPEG output is very pleasant. So, while it falls behind in just about every regard, it's still a likeable option if you just want a small, easy-to-use camera that takes good photos.

    Sony a6400 vs Fujifilm X-E3

    The Fujifilm X-E3 is also a 24MP APS-C rangefinder-styled mirrorless camera without built-in stabilization, so why do the two cameras seem so un-alike? Part of the reason is that the Fujifilm is a much less expensive body paired with a much more expensive lens (the 18-55mm F2.8-4 OIS is one of our favorite kit lenses, which is not something anyone has ever said of the Sony 16-50mm power zoom).

    The X-E3 shoots beautiful images, thanks to one of the best JPEG engines in the business. However, while it's a nicer camera to take control over than the Sony, it's not the best-handling Fujifilm, with a bit too much dependence on the little fiddly command dials. It also can't come near the Sony in terms of AF speed or dependability or even usability (you can't tell the camera which face in your scene to target, for example), and is one of the only 4K cameras to exhibit more rolling shutter than the Sony.

    Sony a6400 vs Nikon D5600

    The other camera that falls into the 'cheaper body, better lens' category is the Nikon D5600 DSLR. The twin-dial D7500 is rather more expensive, as well as being larger, so we'd consider the D5600 and 18-140mm F3.5-5.6 VR kit to be most directly comparable. The single dial setup of the D5600 also ends up making you as dependent on the function menus as the Sony does.

    Despite being a DSLR (meaning fewer, less accurate AF points, more tightly grouped near the center,) the D5600 perhaps comes closest to matching the Sony for ease of getting the AF point to stay on your chosen subject (though it's nowhere near as sticky, nor does it function as well in low light). However, its video specs are nowhere near that of the mirrorless cameras: offering only 1080 capture and essentially unusable video AF. Like the Fujifilm, you'd only choose this over the Sony if you exclusively shoot stills, and don't need the AF capabilities of the Sony.

    Conclusion

    Sony's a6000 has always been a popular camera, but the more advanced a6300 and a6500 models don't stand out from their peers quite so well, despite the more advanced technology and impressive looking specifications. We've always found them capable all-rounders but not always the most enjoyable to use (especially if you want to take control over what's going on).

    The a6400 has immediately impressed us in this regard: the revamped autofocus performance and, just as importantly, usability in its simplicity means there's one less thing to wrestle against the camera over.

    As with every system, it's worth checking the lens lineup offers you the options you want, but our early impressions are of a camera that'll turn itself to a bit of everything gaining possibly the most capable and usable AF systems we've encountered. Which may just be the cherry on the cake.

  6. Video: 'The Terrible History of Photographs' as told by puppets

    There are plenty of videos on YouTube that dive into the history of photography. But few will make you laugh like this one will.

    This tongue-in-cheek video, created by YouTube channel Glove and Boots, shares The Terrible History of Photographs using puppets, a la Sesame Street.

    The video comes in just under five minutes and in that time both Glove and Boots (as well as their gorilla friend) explain a very basic, cynical look at how photography got to where it is today and the terrible, no good, awful technology that camera before smartphones.

  7. Sample gallery: Sony a9 with beta firmware 5.0

    This week Sony announced new firmware updates coming soon for the a9. Firmware version 5.0 officially arrives in March and adds some powerful autofocus improvements to the camera's already impressive AF toolkit. Quite simply, it makes the a9 an industry leader in AF tracking ability, and there are purported updates to color and tonality as well. There's much more analysis to come, but for now here's a selection of the images captured with a beta version of the new firmware, and exclusively using the new Real-Time Tracking autofocus mode.

    See our Sony a9 firmware 5.0 beta
    sample gallery

  8. DJI addresses alleged corruption scandal that reportedly increased product prices by 20%

    DJI Technology, China's largest drone manufacturer, is looking at a substantial financial loss in the midst of ongoing investigations wherein 45 current and former employees are facing allegations of corruption.

    According to a report from Yicai Global, more than 100 individuals are involved in an alleged widespread corruption scandal for falsely increasing the prices of parts and materials used to make DJI drones.

    The report says 26 people allegedly involved in the scandal 'are from the research and development department, as well as the procurement division.' Another 19 individuals work in other various departments including administration, design, factories and sales. 16 people have been reported to authorities regarding the allegations.

    In a statement to DroneDJ, DJI said:

    'We hold our employees to the highest ethical standards and take any violation of our code of ethics very seriously. During a recent investigation, DJI itself found some employees inflated the cost of parts and materials for certain products for personal financial gain. We took swift action to address this issue, fired the bad actors, and contacted law enforcement officials. We continue to investigate the situation and are cooperating fully with law enforcement’s investigation.'

    DJI is facing losses of more than CNY1 billion (approximately $147.6 million USD), according to Yicai Global's estimates. It is believed DJI products suffered from a 20% price increase in 2018 due to the alleged widespread corruption within the supply chain.